Recreational yoga reading does a mind good

Recreational reading is an indulgence in itself so offering time for the body to rest, and mind to expedition in the teaching of B.K.S. Iyengar is quite the luxury. Within the first fifty page, I connect to his words pertaining to the “real” goal of a yoga instructor is to teach the students expansion, and then extension.  It feels in asana we spend years “extending” and after time and time of practice the space to really expand occurs and we begin to experience the freedom.  Space creates freedom.

Despite the yoga upbringing in my early adult years favored Ashtanga, my desire for a teaching training program led me to Marianne Wells, an Iyengar teacher from Minnesota offering teacher training immersions in Costa Rica. There, in her training, I began to find the  deeper, and much more vast than I had imagined history and distinct lineages of yoga available to us.

Years later, textbooks on Ayurveda and trainings have surrounded me for some time, and I’ve put off learning Spanish (with commitment!) and painting that hallway in my home just isn’t going to happen this summer. Despite numerous other projects sit by the wayside, including my garden this year, I’ve thoroughly enjoyed absorbing more content than I’ve previously interpreted from a master of asana and yoga teachings, B.K.S. Iyengar in his book, “Light on Life”.  Pick it up on paperback or digital. He is an example of great ability to take ancient science of yoga and establish comprehension for the modern yogi.

An indulgent read from a wise master of yoga

An indulgent read from a wise master of yoga